Light Wheat Bread – BBA Challenge bread 18

Light Wheat Bread

The Light Whole Wheat loaf is another one-day bread in the BBA challenge, which makes it one of those breads you can decide to make mid-morning and have it ready to serve with dinner that evening.

What makes this bread “light” is that the whole wheat flour is only a part of the total flour component (the rest is white bread flour or high-gluten flour). Since I live with a picky eater and was hoping to come up with a whole wheat bread that she might enjoy, I went one step further and used King Arthur Flour’s White Whole Wheat flour, which, as the name reveals, is made from milled white wheat (versus the standard red wheat that most whole wheat flour is made from).

This bread is also made lighter by the addition of powdered milk, sugar or honey, and shortening or butter, making it a member of the enriched bread family.

To make the bread, mix the flours, salt, powdered milk, yeast, butter, honey, and water. Knead for about 10 minutes until you achieve a supple dough. Ferment in an oiled bowl for about two hours. After fermenting, shape the dough into a sandwich loaf and place in an oiled loaf pan. Proof for about an hour-and-a-half, and then bake for thirty minutes.

See step-by-step pictures of this bread here.

What you’ll get is by no means a real whole wheat bread, but for those looking to add more whole grain breads to their diet while still making a sandwich bread that makes a respectable jelly sandwich, this one works.

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The Bread Baker’s Apprentice Challenge is a group of home bakers, scattered across the planet, focused on one goal: completing every recipe in Peter Reinhart’s book, The Bread Baker’s Apprentice, in order, and writing about our experience. Want to join us? Buy or borrow a copy of the book, open a big bag of flour, and plunge in!

2 thoughts on “Light Wheat Bread – BBA Challenge bread 18

    • I keep finding myself surprised at how light and airy the breads from this book turn out, including many that look and sound like they’d be hearty and dense. It’s a bit disconcerting.

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